Presentation Details

The Second International Conference on New Directions in the Humanities

The EffecTime Race Juvenile Justice Decision Making One Juvenile Court

Prof. Mike Leiber, Mahesh K. Nalla, Kristan C. Fox.


The “get tough movement” and the “war on drugs” have had a significant impact on the detection and involvement of youth, especially African Americans, in the juvenile justice system. The “get tough movement” and the “war on drugs” have had a significant impact on the detection and involvement of youth, especially African Americans, in the juvenile justice system. Using the symbolic threat thesis as a theoretical framework and data that covers a 21 year-period (1980 to 2000), the present research examines and compares patterns in case processing within the context of the factors that might influence case outcomes for whites and African Americans in one Iowa juvenile court. The findings have implications for advancing our understanding of the social control of youth and in particular, African Americans. The findings have implications for advancing our understanding of the social control of youth and in particular, African Americans.

Presenters

Prof. Mike Leiber  (United States)
Professor
Department of Sociology, Anthropology & Criminology
University of Northern Iowa

Dr. Leiber is a professor in the Department of Sociology/Anthropology and Criminology and the director of the Sociology Graduate Program at the University of Northern Iowa. Dr. Leiber has published articles and reports, as well as presented papers on issues related to juvenile delinquency, juvenile justice, and race/ethnicity. Dr. Leiber also conducted a study on race and juvenile justice decision making in Iowa and the results of that effort are coming out in a forthcoming book by the State University of New York Press. He serves on the state of Iowa’s governor’s juvenile justice advisory group (SAG) and is the chair of the disproportionate minority confinement (DMC) subcommittee. He also acts as a consultant for the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). The services provided include report writing, acting as the national trainer to juvenile justice specialists, DMC coordinators, and state advisory councils on the disproportionate overrepresentation of minority youth in secure facilities, and evaluation of treatment programs and case management information systems. He also is the primary lead on providing intensive technical assistance to the states of Massachusetts and Alaska for developing strategies and interventions to reduce DMC.


Mahesh K. Nalla  (United States)


Michigan State University



Kristan C. Fox  (United States)


University of Northern Iowa


Keywords
  • Race
  • Inequality
  • Discrimination



(30 min. Conference Paper, English)